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1924-D Lincoln Cent W/Die Dent Mint Error on Rev

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SAN View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SAN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: 1924-D Lincoln Cent W/Die Dent Mint Error on Rev
    Posted: 01 Jan 2012 at 11:17am

I have a 1924-D with an error on the reverse side of the penny.




There is a clear depression on the reverse side of this 1924-D beginning at the N in CENT, running through the N in ONE and extending topside to the second U in PLURIBUS.


This depression extends leftward and then ramps up at a line between middle of the O in ONE, extending topside between the first U and R in PLURIBUS.  If you look at the photos closely you can see a faint shadow on the left side of the depression where it ramps upward.






The obverse appears to be normal.  Any opinions on the grade?  To me it seems like it's between a VF-30 and EF-40.  Although brown, it still appears to have some original luster.


NGC categorizes this penny as a 1924-D Reverse Die Dent Mint Error.  I've seen this identical error on another 1924-D in the identical location.


I don't know if Die Dent is an accurate term for this mint error.  There appears to be some disagreement as to the exact cause of this mint error.


Does anyone know how this mint error occurred?  From what I have been reading, this same error has occurred on various years from 1924 to 1944 at all three mints.


http://hermes.csd.net/~coneca/content/esreviews.htm

July/August 2005 Errorscope Review

"Diamond undertakes a survey of flat die dents (paired and unpaired) that can be found on the reverse face of cents carrying the dates 1924, 1941, 1943, and 1944.  Eleven different die pairs are represented incorporating all three mints (PDS).  It’s possible that a machine part – possibly part of the feeder mechanism – is causing this damage.  The dents range from barely noticeable to quite dramatic.  The strongest example occurs in a 1924-D cent.  The discoverer of most of the die dents, Garland McKelvey, has recently reported finding something on the order of 20 more cases, ranging between the years 1920 and 1945."


SAN

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jan 2012 at 7:46am
Looks like a scratch on the die. Since dies are reverse images, it would cause the depression in this location. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SAN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jan 2012 at 1:27pm
The line on the right side of the depression is NOT raised.  A scratch in the die will not cause this and I don't believe that a simple die crack could cause this either.

Going from right side to the left side, the coin surface is flat until the line where it suddenly sinks.  The depression continues to the left until about the middle of the "O" in ONE, where the depression ramps upward and blends in with the rest of the coin surface.

Also note how the "RIBUS" in PLURIBUS is strongly struck, but note that to the left of where the depression ramps up the "E PLU" is weakly struck.

It's like the die was depressed on either side of were the depression is on the penny.

Or the section of the die that made the depression is somehow raised from the rest of the die.

Quite frankly I don't understand how this can happen.

SAN
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dorkkarl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jan 2012 at 8:31am
dang cool error!  i like it!

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"When you have two competing theories which make exactly the same prediction, the one that is simpler is more likely the correct one" - Occam's (or Ockham's) Razor (named for William of Ockham)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cjk916 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Mar 2022 at 1:40pm
Originally posted by SAN SAN wrote:

I have a 1924-D with an error on the reverse side of the penny.




There is a clear depression on the reverse side of this 1924-D beginning at the N in CENT, running through the N in ONE and extending topside to the second U in PLURIBUS.


This depression extends leftward and then ramps up at a line between middle of the O in ONE, extending topside between the first U and R in PLURIBUS.  If you look at the photos closely you can see a faint shadow on the left side of the depression where it ramps upward.






The obverse appears to be normal.  Any opinions on the grade?  To me it seems like it's between a VF-30 and EF-40.  Although brown, it still appears to have some original luster.


NGC categorizes this penny as a 1924-D Reverse Die Dent Mint Error.  I've seen this identical error on another 1924-D in the identical location.


I don't know if Die Dent is an accurate term for this mint error.  There appears to be some disagreement as to the exact cause of this mint error.


Does anyone know how this mint error occurred?  From what I have been reading, this same error has occurred on various years from 1924 to 1944 at all three mints.


http://hermes.csd.net/~coneca/content/esreviews.htm

July/August 2005 Errorscope Review

"Diamond undertakes a survey of flat die dents (paired and unpaired) that can be found on the reverse face of cents carrying the dates 1924, 1941, 1943, and 1944.  Eleven different die pairs are represented incorporating all three mints (PDS).  It’s possible that a machine part – possibly part of the feeder mechanism – is causing this damage.  The dents range from barely noticeable to quite dramatic.  The strongest example occurs in a 1924-D cent.  The discoverer of most of the die dents, Garland McKelvey, has recently reported finding something on the order of 20 more cases, ranging between the years 1920 and 1945."


SAN

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